Chemistry shampoo essay

One of my teachers that is an APUSH grader posts Facebook statuses each day about the dumbest things she reads, so they are allowed to say. But my favorite story was from a teacher that did the AP Lit grading. The teachers are allowed to read the responses to open ended questions on books they haven’t read, but she says that if people aren’t too familiar with them they tend to pass it off to someone who has actually read it. One day she got a response on a book she had never heard of, so she tried to pass it on to someone else. But no one else at her table, or in her room, had heard of it either. Which in this case is strange, because this is a room full of English teachers, and all of the source works for that response are supposed to be of a certain academic caliber. After finally resorting to looking the book up online and calling around to a few bookstores, they determined the book did not exist. Someone had made up an entire plot-line, and then analyzed it and wrote an essay on it.

I saw that someone called you “my hero”. I say also you are my hero. Thank you for your information. If possible you can help me to get simple shampoo processing machine and the ingredients with its formulation. Some people want you rescue from hell; but some are pushing and let you stay in there. As a reason rescued are prisimg the one who rescued. Please I am beging you rescue me. I am living in life which I hate for survival. If you give me full information, not me, God will pay you for me. I may also have a time to prize you.

@Seppo – I feel the frustration that consumers like yourself feel. Why can there not be clarity with cosmetics, you ask. I will tell you why consumers like you reading this are confused… It is because you are of the innate belief that “natural” is safer than “synthetic” and this fairly rational belief system has become cynically taken advantage of by so-called Natural or Organic brands. Rather than blaming the scare-mongering anti-scientists who have a vested interest in whipping up conspiracy theories (usually about saving money and not caring about safety – which is total nonsense), consumers blame the science-based cosmetic companies who are thus being punished twice. The reason there is confusion over SLS and why you cannot get proper information is because (with respect) you will not believe the institutions like the FDA and scientists like Dene and Colin telling you that there is nothing to worry about. And that you are not critically thinking (as I am sure you do in a less emotive subject of which you are more familiar) as to why it is the so-called Natural companies who have hood-winked you with their cynical marketing playing on irrational fears – and worse, not even eliminating the so-called danger while benefiting from the fears.

Procedure (See Pictures on page 3 and 4 forInitial and Final results in order to answer post-lab questions)
1. Find four household substances to test (ex: grape juice, lemon juice, dishwashing liquid, milk, tomato juice, shampoo, corn starch solution, etc.). You will use the vinegar (acidic) and sodium bicarbonate (basic) solution provided in your kit as standards.
2. Predict the pH of each substance before testing with a pH strip. Record your predictions in Table 4 for each substance.
3. Use the permanent marker to label each of the beakers with the name of one of the six solutions. It does not matter which size beaker is used for the different solutions.
4. Use the graduated cylinder to measure and pour five mL of vinegar into the beaker labeled “Vinegar”.
5. Repeat Step 4 with each of the five remaining solutions and beakers.
6. Measure the pH of each solution by dipping the pad of the pH strip into the solution for 5 – 10 seconds and comparing it with the pH test strip key (located in the lab module). Record your results in Table 4 for each substance.
Table 4: pH Values of Common Household Substances
Substance pH Test Strip Color pH Value
1- Acetic Acid (Vinegar) Orange 5
2- Sodium Bicarbonate Solution (Baking Soda) Dark Green 8
3 – Lemon Juice Orange 5
4 – Milk Light Green 6
5 – Tomato Juice Orange 5
6 – Grape Juice Orange 5

Chemistry shampoo essay

chemistry shampoo essay

Procedure (See Pictures on page 3 and 4 forInitial and Final results in order to answer post-lab questions)
1. Find four household substances to test (ex: grape juice, lemon juice, dishwashing liquid, milk, tomato juice, shampoo, corn starch solution, etc.). You will use the vinegar (acidic) and sodium bicarbonate (basic) solution provided in your kit as standards.
2. Predict the pH of each substance before testing with a pH strip. Record your predictions in Table 4 for each substance.
3. Use the permanent marker to label each of the beakers with the name of one of the six solutions. It does not matter which size beaker is used for the different solutions.
4. Use the graduated cylinder to measure and pour five mL of vinegar into the beaker labeled “Vinegar”.
5. Repeat Step 4 with each of the five remaining solutions and beakers.
6. Measure the pH of each solution by dipping the pad of the pH strip into the solution for 5 – 10 seconds and comparing it with the pH test strip key (located in the lab module). Record your results in Table 4 for each substance.
Table 4: pH Values of Common Household Substances
Substance pH Test Strip Color pH Value
1- Acetic Acid (Vinegar) Orange 5
2- Sodium Bicarbonate Solution (Baking Soda) Dark Green 8
3 – Lemon Juice Orange 5
4 – Milk Light Green 6
5 – Tomato Juice Orange 5
6 – Grape Juice Orange 5

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